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Patriots

Italy’s Return to Fascism? Live with Jonah Goldberg, Nick Gillespie, and Zach Weissmueller [Video]

A live discussion with the editor in chief of The Dispatch about Giorgia Meloni, Italy’s incoming prime minister. Drop your questions in the chat!—–

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Patriot Activists

Students Finally Winning The School Choice Fight [Video]

Dozens of states expanded school choice in the last two years, allowing more students to leave government-run schools. But David Walrod, the president of a teachers’ union in Fairfax, Virginia, says the new school choice programs are harmful. We debate.————To make sure you see the new weekly video from Stossel TV, sign up here: https://www.johnstossel.com/#subscribe————Many kids have good reasons to leave government-run schools. Such schools often needlessly shut down for Covid, and stayed closed for two years. Some indoctrinate kids. Many leave bad teachers on the job. Many spend absurd amounts of money. (Fairfax, Virginia, schools spend more than $300k per classroom.) But Walrod says that school choice will create too many different schools, and duplicate wasteful bureaucracies.You can watch our debate in the video above.

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Patriots

Corey DeAngelis & Nick Gillespie: COVID changed education forever [Video]

This interview will premiere on Monday, September 26 at 2pm ET. Corey DeAngelis and Nick Gillespie will be in the chat taking your questions!——Of all the dislocations caused by government responses to COVID-19, arguably none were more disruptive to everyday life than the shutting down of in-person education for the country’s 50 million public K-12 students and their parents.Teachers unions fought to keep schools online even as evidence piled up that remote learning was disastrous for poor kids especially, and as the experiences of other developed countries, which mostly continued to operate in person, demonstrated that schools weren’t a major source of infection.The results were easy to predict: historic declines in reading and math scores. Major school districts continue to alienate parents. Washington, D.C., recently decreed that kids ages 12 and older would need to be vaccinated even for remote learning, a measure that would have barred 40 percent of the city’s black teens from getting an education. That policy was, thankfully, pushed back until January 2023, but it’s still on the books, lurking like a bully at the far end of the hallway.More parents than ever have exited major urban school districts and school choice proponents are building on recent policy victories, such as Arizona’s new law in which money follows the child, with up to $7,000 that can be used at any public or private school in the state.The politics of school choice are already a major issue in the midterm elections and will be again in 2024, especially as internal polls conducted by the American Federation of Teachers find for the first time that voters in battleground states are more likely to agree that Republicans are better on education than Democrats.What happens next?At FreedomFest, the annual July gathering in Las Vegas, Reason’s Nick Gillespie talked with Corey DeAngelis, a senior fellow at the American Federation for Children, and a senior fellow at Reason Foundation, the nonprofit that publishes Reason. We talked about how COVID has permanently reshaped the education landscape, why top-down bans on critical race theory are ineffective and anti-freedom, why some red states like Texas are terrible on school choice, and why all of us, whether or not we have kids in K-12 schools, should all be invested in radical reform.Photo Credits: Abssch, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons; Gage Skidmore from Surprise, AZ, United States of America, CC BY-SA 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons; college.library, CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons; Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call/Newscom; Karla Ann Cote/ZUMAPRESS/Newscom; Charles Edward Miller from Chicago, United States, CC0, via Wikimedia Commons; Lev Radin/ZUMAPRESS/Newscom; Johnny Milano/Polaris/Newscom.Music Credits: “Release the Hounds (instrumental version),” by Michael Shynes, via Artlist.Interview by Nick Gillespie. Edited by Regan Taylor and Adam Czarnecki.

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Patriots

Abolish Nuclear Weapons? A Soho Forum Debate [Video]

Author Ward Wilson advocates eliminating nuclear weapons. Defense consultant Peter Huessy says that’s unrealistic.https://reason.com/video/2022/09/23/abolish-nuclear-weapons-a-soho-forum-debate/————————-Is it imperative that the world eliminate all nuclear weapons? That was the topic of a live debate hosted by the Soho Forum on September 19, 2022.Ward Wilson is the author of Five Myths About Nuclear Weapons and executive director of RealistRevolt. He argued that nuclear weapons have almost no practical application, and it’s time to end world leaders’ fascination with their awe-inspiring power.Peter Huessy is director of strategic deterrent studies at the Mitchell Institute for Aerospace Studies and president of his own defense consulting firm, GeoStrategic Analysis. He argued that we can’t get to nuclear abolition without getting other nuclear powers on board, including Russia and China, both of which see nuclear weapons as essential tools in their foreign policy agendas.The debate was held at the Sheen Center in downtown Manhattan and was moderated by Soho Forum Director Gene Epstein.Narrated by Nick Gillespie; edited by John OsterhoudtPhotos: event photography by Brett Raney; Mikhail Metzel/ZUMAPRESS/Newscom Format; Ju Peng Xinhua News Agency/Newscom

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Patriots

Is This Atlanta Streetcar ‘The Worst Transit Project of All Time’? [Video]

Transit ridership, especially rail, has collapsed post-pandemic, but the Atlanta BeltLine Coalition says now is the time to take federal dollars and build a $2.5 billion streetcar. Full text and links: https://reason.com/video/2022/09/22/is-this-atlanta-streetcar-the-worst-transit-project-of-all-time/—Twenty-three years ago, Atlanta-native and architecture and urban planning student Ryan Gravel had an experience that opened his mind to what urban living could be.”My senior year I spent abroad in Paris and lived without a car for a year and traveled by train everywhere,” says Gravel. “And within a month of arriving, I had lost 15 pounds. I was in the best shape of my life because I was walking everywhere, and the role of the physical city was made clear to me in a way it really had never been before.”For his Georgia Tech master’s thesis, Gravel sketched out a plan to make Atlanta more like Paris. He proposed redeveloping the land along the city’s historic rail lines to create a 22-mile loop called the Atlanta BeltLine. He proposed turning the city’s abandoned industrial areas and single-family home neighborhoods into business districts and walking trails. And he proposed connecting downtown to the rest of the city all with a new train running along the entire Atlanta BeltLine.”I never imagined we would actually do it,” says Gravel.But they did—for the most part. Cathy Woolard, who was president of the Atlanta City Council, read Gravel’s thesis and decided to use it as a blueprint to remake much of the city. Today, the Atlanta BeltLine is a walking and biking trail, parts of which are bordered by retail and condos.But one piece of Gravel’s grand vision didn’t get built: The train.Today, Gravel runs a co-working and event space along the BeltLine, which also serves as a gathering place for urbanists interested in making Atlanta less dependent on cars. He says that the train line is essential for improving city life.”In those early days, when we built the movement behind the [BeltLine] project, it was around transit,” says Gravel.The three COVID relief bills set aside $69 billion in federal funding for local transit agencies to operate and add to their transportation systems, meaning that Atlanta might finally get its train—with many American taxpayers who will never step foot on it picking up much of the tab.Many American cities have used federal money in the past to build rail transit lines that suffer from dismal ridership, that are expensive to maintain, and that are a major drain on their budgets.Produced by Zach Weissmueller; edited by Danielle Thompson; additional graphics by Isaac Reese; camera by David Lyman; production assistance by Addie Mae.   Music: “Sur Le Manège” by Francesco D’Andrea via Artlist; “Poligon” by Crazy Paris via Artlist; “XIII” by Angel Salazar via Artlist; “Manhattan” by Will Van De Crommert via Artlist; “Blink: by Swirling Ship via Artlist; “Sunrise City” by Sebastian Borromeo via Artlist; “Cold War” by Maya Pacziga via Artlist; “cdHiddenDir” by Out of Flux via Artlist; “Attracting Drama” by Rhythm Scott via Artlist; “Always Ready” by Rhythm Scott via Artlist; “The Woodworks” by Jacob Kinstle via Artlist; “Happy on My Own” by Kyle Cox via ArtlistPhotos: null/Newscom; Walter Bibikow / DanitaDelimont.com / Danita Delimont Photography/Newscom; DPST/Newscom; Boston Public Library, CC BY 2.0., Via Wikimedia Commons;  Abaca Press/Gripas Yuri/Abaca/Sipa USA/Newscom; Richard B. Levine/Newscom; Michael Ho Wai Lee / SOPA Images/Newscom; Michael Ho Wai Lee / SOPA Images/Newscom; Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call/Newscom; Kent D. Johnson/TNS/Newscom; Vittorio Sciosia/Newscom; Gabriele Holtermann-Gorden/Sipa/Newscom; Josep Suria/Westend61 GmbH/Newscom; Eugenio Marongiu/Westend61 GmbH/Newscom; William Perugini/Westend61 GmbH/Newscom; Rod Lamkey – CNP/Newscom; CNP/AdMedia/Newscom; CNP/AdMedia/Newscom; Rod Lamkey – CNP/picture alliance / Consolidated News Photos/Newscom; TIM SHAFFER/KRT/Newscom; Scott J. Ferrell/Congressional Quarterly/Newscom; Bill Clark/Roll Call Photos/Newscom; TOM GRALISH/MCT/Newscom; Pool/TNS/Newscom; Doug Mills – Pool via CNP/Newscom; Lev Radin/Pacific Press/Newscom; CNP/AdMedia/Newscom; Graeme Sloan/Sipa USA/Newscom; Walter P. Reuther Library/Wayne State University; Aysegul Akturk, Alex Fox, Ivana Rosas, Carrie Sauer, and Manali Sheth; Harris & Ewing Collection, Library of Congress; Detroit Publishing Company, Library of Congress

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Patriot Activists

Adam Carolla on Free Speech, Cancel Culture, AOC and Covid Hysteria. [Video]

Millions of people listen to Adam Carolla’s podcasts, attend his live shows, and read his books.————To make sure you see the new weekly video from Stossel TV, sign up here: https://www.johnstossel.com/#subscribe————He once hosted hit shows like “Loveline” and “The Man Show.”Over the years, Carolla’s comedy has caused controversy.Now his opinions make people angry.“If AOC were fat and in her 60’s,” Carolla says, “no one would listen to her.”That comment drove leftists crazy.But Carolla won’t back down.When critics demand apologies, he tells me, they really want power.”They want you to apologize,” Carolla says, “because they want dominion over you. And once you apologize, they just keep coming back.”He gives examples in his new book, “Everything Reminds Me of Something: Advice, Answers…but No Apologies.”

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Patriots

Ron DeSantis: Good or Bad for Liberty? [Video]

A live discussion about how libertarians should think about the country’s most controversial governor.—–No governor is more cheered and hated right now than Florida Republican Ron DeSantis, currently in the news for flying around 50 Venezuelan migrants to Martha’s Vineyard. The 44-year-old Navy veteran and double-Ivy-Leaguer also headlined the third National Conservatism Conference, where he emphasized that the state should punish and reward businesses and individuals based on political positions.Controversially, DeSantis has yanked longstanding tax breaks for Walt Disney Corporation after the company criticized his stance on gay rights, signed legislation that would limit social media platforms’ ability to moderate content and users (the law has been blocked by a federal court), banned mask mandates in public schools, and issued an executive order prohibiting businesses from requiring proof of vaccination from customers. He’s also pushed cities such as Gainesville to abandon zoning reform aimed at creating more diverse, multi-family housing.If such top-down edicts seem at odds with traditional conservative support for local decision making and support for business interests, DeSantis has also gotten high marks for mostly keeping K-12 schools open during the pandemic and overseeing a boom in people moving to Florida to escape lockdowns elsewhere. When COVID death rates are adjusted for the age of residents, Florida’s rate (275 per 100,000) draws close to California’s (267 per 100,000), while both are below the national average (302 per 100,000).  He’s a strong supporter of gun rights and signed a $1.2 billion tax break package this spring, promising even more cuts if he gets reelected in November. Despite increased levels of spending each year of his governorship, the state is currently sitting on a $22 billion budget surplus.So how should libertarians think about Ron DeSantis? Is he “a retaliatory culture warrior” and the leading indicator of an “authoritarian convergence” of the right and left? Or is he a successful large-state governor, the future of the Republican party, and, quite possibly, the next president of the United States? How should libertarians think about his mix of bullying and bravura that is turning the Sunshine State from a joke to one of the hottest destinations in the country?Nick Gillespie leads a conversation about DeSantis and Florida with two recent blue-state refugees: Reason Senior Producer Zach Weissmueller, who pulled up stakes in California, and New York Post columnist Karol Markowicz, who hightailed it out of New York.

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Patriots

How American Anti-Semitism Helped the Nazis [Video]

A new PBS series by Ken Burns argues xenophobia, the Great Depression, incredulity toward the media, and State Department antisemitism combined to keep Jewish refugees out of America.https://reason.com/video/2022/09/15/how-closed-borders-helped-facilitate-the-holocaust/Two-thirds of European Jews were killed by the Nazis during World War II in a systematic, relentless process that still exceeds our ability to comprehend its origins and consequences. The Final Solution, which was the Nazi plan to exterminate all European Jews, wasn’t implemented until 1942, but Hitler’s government had begun openly dehumanizing, harassing, and attacking Jews upon taking power nine years earlier.Even when the Nazi death machine kicked into high gear, America kept its doors mostly closed to Jews, as filmmakers Ken Burns, Lynn Novick, and Sarah Botstein recount in The U.S. and the Holocaust, a new three-part documentary series on PBS. Some lobbied to open the country to refugees in the run-up to war, but anti-immigration legislation, the economic devastation of the Depression, incredulity toward a press that had trafficked in false atrocity accounts during World War I, and deep-seated antisemitism, especially in Franklin Roosevelt’s State Department, combined to thwart those efforts.Reason talked with Burns and Novick about why a nation of immigrants remains so deeply ambivalent about newcomers and the lessons that 21st-century America should draw from our country’s response in the lead-up to the Holocaust.Photo Credits: Bundesarchiv, Bild 183-R69919 / CC-BY-SA 3.0, CC BY-SA 3.0 DE, via Wikimedia Commons; Bookofblue, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons; China Crisis, CC BY 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons; Grillo assumed (based on copyright claims)., CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons; Prelinger Archives; Newspapers; Internet Archive: Takkk, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons; The U.S. and the Holocaust / Florentine Films and WETA.Music Credits: “Emanuele Errante,” by Altered Communications via Artlist.ioInterview by Nick Gillespie; Edited by Regan Taylor and Adam Czarnecki

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Patriot Activists

Classic Stossel: Disaster Relief [Video]

A big storm does NOT require big government – people come together to help one another.After Hurricane Katrina, the New York Times ran the headline: “A Big Storm Requires Big Government.” But FEMA did an awful job. By contrast, private businesses like Walmart, and charities like Oklahoma Baptist Disaster Relief helped many people, much more quickly. A Classic Stossel from 2015

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Patriots

Saving Afghans After the U.S. Withdrawal [Video]

Green Beret Scott Mann suffered severe trauma following his three tours in Afghanistan. He never wanted to have anything to do with country again. Then his friend Nezam called to say that his life was in danger.https://reason.com/video/”There was a point when I stood in my closet holding a .45 caliber,” recalls Scott Mann, a Green Beret who suffered severe trauma after his three tours in Afghanistan. He resolved never to have anything to do with the country ever again.”I didn’t wanna go back to that,” he says.Following the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan in August of 2021, Mann got a call from an Afghan special operator named Nezam whose life was in danger. He was one of hundreds of Afghans who had worked with the Americans being targeted by the Taliban.”It was very obvious that he was in severe duress,” Mann tells Reason. “This guy was the quintessential special operator and truly a brother…how do I leave this guy?”Mann decided he had to help save his friend’s life. “I ended up calling a couple of buddies who were still in active duty [and] who had fought with Nezam [and] who loved him.” Working their contacts, the group managed to get Nezam out of harm’s way in a harrowing sequence of events.”That’s how Task Force Pineapple was born,” he recalls. Mann received the 2022 Savas Award for privatization, awarded annually by the Reason Foundation, which is the nonprofit that publishes Reason TV, Reason magazine, and Reason.com. The prize recognized his extraordinary effort in creating Operation Pineapple Express, a volunteer network that has helped hundreds of Afghan nationals escape the country.Produced by Noor Greene; edited by Danielle Thompson; illustrations by Joel Connell; camera and motion graphics by Isaac Reese; narrated by Nick Gillespie; sound editing by Ian Keyser.Photos: Saifurahman Safi / Xinhua News Agency/Newscom; DPST/Newscom; DPST/Newscom; EyePress/Newscom;  Isaías Ibáñez/Dreamstime.comMusic: “Back Home” by Max H. via Artlist; “Until Then” by Michael Ellery via Artlist; “Discovery” by Roman P via Artlist; “Heart” by Roman P via Artlist; “On the Edge” by Max H. via Artlist